Comments Posted By Goodscarrier
Displaying 1 To 9 Of 9 Comments

TIME FOR MALIKI TO FILL OUT THE EMPTY SUIT

If Al-Maliki is not tied in with the death squads, why has he has been so soft and inactive against the death squads?

If Al-Maliki is not tied in with the death squads, why would he `for months promise tough action against the militias and then do nothing, or worse, complain publicly and bitterly when American forces have confronted the Sadrists?

If Maliki is not tied in with the death squads why has `he has proven in the past to be a spineless jellyfish when it comes to going after al-Sadr?'

You seem quite clueless about Maliki.

You are so strangely frustrated about Al-Maliki's inaction when it is actually highly IRRATIONAL and SCATTERBRAINED to think/expect that Al-Maliki is going to *change course* after having given the last twenty plus years of his life to the cause of transforming Iraq into a Shiite fundamentalist republic.

Al-Dawa and the SCIRI are not pro-American, pro-Western, etc.

Al-Dawa and the SCIRI are pro-Hizbollah, pro-Iranian, etc.

Comment Posted By goodscarrier On 12.01.2007 @ 17:37

How can you write that Bayan Jabr and Al-Maliki are not tied in together?

Is Pres. Bush not tied together with Secretary Paulson ?

There is a lot very public evidence that Bayan Jabr and Al-Maliki are tied together.

Comment Posted By goodscarrier On 12.01.2007 @ 16:49

There is not one shred of evidence that Maliki is tied in with Jabr, the former Interior Minister, and the death squads.

Bayan Jabr is tied in with Al-Maliki.

Al-Maliki is tied in with Bayan Jabr.

1) From the CIA (Last Updated: 12/18/2006)

Chiefs of State and Cabinet Members of Foreign Governments

Min. of Finance Bayan JABR

2) Iraqi Council of Ministers Presented to the Parliament by Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki May 20, 2006

Baqir Jabr al-Zubaydi (a.k.a. Bayan Jabr), Minister of Finance (Unified Iraqi Coalition - SCIRI)

3) New Iraqi Government Approved By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Service BAGHDAD, May 20, 2006

(snip)

Former Interior Minister Bayan Jabr Solagh will serve as finance minister.

4) Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs
October 2006, Background Note: Iraq (www.state.gov)

(snip)

Minister of Finance--Bayan Jabr

5) Iraq is failing to spend billions in oil revenues, by James Glanz, New York Times
12/11/2006

(snip)

Iraq’s total budget is about $32 billion in 2006 and is projected to be more than $40 billion in 2007, said Bayan Jabr, the Iraqi finance minister, in an interview.

Comment Posted By goodscarrier On 12.01.2007 @ 16:40

There is not one shred of evidence that Maliki is tied in with Jabr, the former Interior Minister, and the death squads.

C'mon, get real man.

People are being maimed and killed, hundreds of billions are wasted, and you do not even know who is in the Iraqi government.

Bayan Jabr is currently serving as the Finance Minister of Iraq in the government of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.

Bayan Jabr is a senior member of the Shiite United Iraqi Alliance and the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI).

Comment Posted By goodscarrier On 12.01.2007 @ 16:27

Bush surrenders Iraq to Maliki’s death squads
by Ahmed Amr
Saturday November 4, 2006

(snip)

The latest media farce is to portray Nouri Al-Maliki as a man out to curb the violence and chaos in our Mesopotamian colony. According to this fable, The Prime Minister is caught between Iraq and a hard place - forced to navigate a treacherous path between a desire to assert the Iraqi State’s monopoly of violence over ‘rogue’ elements in the security forces and the Shia parties that engineered his ascension to power.

There is only one problem with this tale of Maliki’s woes. The Prime Minister is the defacto chairman of the death squads – a radical partisan leader who is out to insure Shia supremacy in the new Iraq. Maliki, Bayan Jabr and Moqtada Sadr are cut of the same ideological cloth. They are men who have spent a lifetime in the quest to convert Iraq into a Shia theocracy – by any means necessary.

The Maliki/Bush videoconference will go down as one of the single most important events that will shape the future of that tormented nation. It was at once a surrender ceremony and a coup d’etat. Maliki walked away with a license to continue operating his death squads and Bush was forced to accept the burden of training more rank and file assassins.

Comment Posted By goodscarrier On 12.01.2007 @ 14:12

Rick Moran,

In Iraq, tens of thousands of people have been maimed and murdered and hundreds of billions of dollars have been spent for the sake of a burgeoning fundamentalist Islamic republic which has extremely close and long standing ties to Iran.

That is how it is. That is not going to change.

Plus, when SH was persecuting and murdering pro-Iranian Shiites in the 80s and 90s, the US basically did nothing to stop it.

With that it mind, it is sheer ignorance and/or just plain stupidity to think that Al-Maliki, Al-Hakim, et al are going to become stooges for Bush.

It is a widely known fact that these guys have spent their whole mature lives *fighting* to transform Iraq into a Shiite fundamentalist republic.

This is into whose hands Bush has thrusted the reins of power?

They sure as hell do not forget the blind eye of the US in the 80s and 90s.

How so?

Well, did you know that before the deposing of SH, Iraqis use to sit in teashops to smoke, etc. A hugely popular topic was Ghenghis Khan, i.e. the "SOB" who invaded sacred Bablyon about seven hundred years ago.

If Iraqis cannot forgive/forget Ghenghis Khan, how are they ever going to forgive/forget about the US' inaction/action in the 80s, 90s, Abu Ghraib, etc.?

The US is screwed.

Not another drop of blood and treasure should be spent propping up this extremist republic which the US will no doubt have to fight in the future.

Here's more on Al-Dawa...

Excerpt from "The Iran-Iraq War: Struggle Without End" 1984

The Shiite faction, Al Dawa (the Call), was expelled from Iraq in early 1980 by President Hussein.

Drawing its support from the large Shiite population in southeastern Iraq, Al Dawa attempted to establish a fundamentalist Islamic state to replace the secular Ba'ath Socialist government of President Hussein.

The present leader of Al Dawa, Hojatoleslam Mohammed Baqr Hakim, is operating from Tehran where he has directed terrorist attacks against targets throughout
the Middle East.

It is uncertain if Tehran is directly controlling the
activities of Al Dawa abroad or if it is just giving tacit approval for Al Dawa's activities.

In either case, Iran's support of Al Dawa is unacceptable and cessation of hostilities favorable to Iraq is now the preferred option for the White House.

Comment Posted By goodscarrier On 12.01.2007 @ 14:07

harrison Said: Look at their actions, not their rhetoric.

Yes, let’s look at the past action of Al-Dawa:

Keywords: Al Dawa, Islamic Fundamentalism, Sharia, Iran and Iraq, terrorism, US Embassy attack

The party in power (Al Dawa) in Iraq has a long history with Iran and with terrorism.

1) Large Turnout Reported For 1st Iraqi Vote Since '58 The Washington Post, June 21, 1980

In another development today, Al Dawa, a clandestine Iraqi fundamentalist Moslem organization, claimed responsibility for yesterday's grenade attack on the British Embassy here in which three gunmen reportedly were killed.

An Al Dawa spokesman told Agence France-Presse by phone that the attack was a "punitive operation against a center of British and American plotters."

2) Iraq Keeps a Tight Rein on Shiites While Bidding to Win Their Loyalty The Washington Post, November 30, 1982

Membership in Dawa, which means "the call," is punishable by execution. Dawa guerrillas were known for hurling grenades into crowds during religious ceremonies, and attacks claimed by the party were frequent until the middle of 1980.

3) U.S. HAS LIST OF BOMB SUSPECTS, LEBANESE SAYS Detroit Free Press, October 29, 1983

The source said the drivers of the two bomb-laden trucks were blessed before their mission by Sheikh Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah, leader of the Iranian-backed Dawa Party, a Lebanese Shiite Muslim splinter group.

4) SHULTZ SEES LINK BETWEEN BEIRUT, KUWAIT ATTACKS OFFICIALS IDENTIFY MAN WHO DROVE TRUCK BOMB, The Miami Herald, December 14, 1983

Secretary of State George Shultz said Tuesday that there "quite likely" was a link between the U.S. Embassy bombing in Kuwait and attacks on American facilities in Lebanon. He warned of possible retaliation.

(snip)

The sources said the investigators matched the prints on the fingers with those on file with Kuwaiti authorities and tentatively identified the assailant as Raed Mukbil, an Iraqi automobile mechanic who lived in Kuwait and was a member of Hezb Al Dawa, a fundamentalist Iraqi Shiite Moslem group based in Iran.

5) KUWAIT NABS 10 SHIITES IN BOMBINGS 7 IRAQIS, 3 LEBANESE 'ADMIT' TERROR ATTACKS
The Miami Herald, December 19, 1983

Kuwait Sunday announced the arrests of 10 Shiite Moslems with ties to Iran in the terrorist bombings that killed four people and wounded 66 last week at the U.S. Embassy and other targets.

(snip)

Hussein said fingerprints from the driver who died in the blast at the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait identified him as Raad Akeel al Badran, an Iraqi mechanic who lived in Kuwait and belonged to the Dawa party.

6) 10 Pro-Iranian Shiites Held in Kuwait Bombings, The Washington Post December 19, 1983

Kuwait announced yesterday the arrest of 10 Shiite Moslems with ties to Iran in terrorist bombings that killed four people and wounded 66 last Monday at the U.S. Embassy and other targets.

"All 10 have admitted involvement in the incidents as well as participating in planning the blasts," Abdul Aziz Hussein, minister of state for Cabinet affairs, told reporters after a Cabinet session, United Press International reported.

Hussein said the seven Iraqis and three Lebanese were members of the Al Dawa party, a radical Iraqi Shiite Moslem group with close ties to Iran.

7) Beirut Bombers Seen Front for Iranian-Supported Shiite Faction, The Washington Post, January 4, 1984

The terrorist group that claimed responsibility for the bombing of the U.S. Marine compound and the French military headquarters here may be a front for an exiled Iraqi Shiite opposition party based in Iran, in the view of a number of Arab and western diplomatic sources.

Authorities in Kuwait say their questioning of suspects in the recent bombing there of the U.S. and French embassies indicates a clear link between Islamic Jihad, a shadowy group that says it carried out the Beirut attacks, and Al Dawa Islamiyah, the main source of resistance to the government of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.

Al Dawa (The Call) has been outlawed in Iraq, where it wants to establish a fundamentalist Islamic state to replace the secular Baath Socialist government of Saddam Hussein, who is a Sunni Moslem.

It draws its strength from the large Shiite population in southern Iraq. Thousands of its most militant members were expelled to Iran in 1980 before the outbreak of the Iranian-Iraqi war and joined Al Dawa there. But it also has a large following in Lebanon among Iraqi exiles and sympathetic Lebanese Shiites.

While Al Dawa operates out of Tehran, it is not clear whether its activities abroad are under direct Iranian control or merely have Iran's tacit acceptance.

8)Baalbek Seen As Staging Area For Terrorism, The Washington Post, January 9, 1984

Al Dawa, according to Arab and western sources, is believed to have had a role in the Oct. 23 suicide bomb attacks on the U.S. Marine and French military compounds in Beirut.

Comment Posted By Goodscarrier On 12.01.2007 @ 11:55

harrison Said: Look at their actions, not their rhetoric.

Yes, let's look at the actions of the Al-Dawa party and the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution of Iraq.

They are not pro-USA.

For the last twenty plus years they have not been pro-USA.

Here's what's been going on....

Excerpt from "Iraq: Bush's Islamic Republic" by Peter W. Galbraith
(snip)

SCIRI and Dawa want Iraq to be an Islamic state. They propose to make Islam the principal source of law, which most immediately would affect the status of women. For Muslim women, religious law—rather than Iraq's relatively progressive civil code—would govern personal status, including matters relating to marriage, divorce, property, and child custody. A Dawa draft for the Iraqi constitution would limit religious freedom for non-Muslims, and apparently deny such freedom altogether to peoples not "of the book," such as the Yezidis (a significant minority in Kurdistan), Zoroastrians, and Bahais.

This program is not just theoretical. Since Saddam's fall, Shiite religious parties have had de facto control over Iraq's southern cities. There Iranian-style religious police enforce a conservative Islamic code, including dress codes and bans on alcohol and other non-Islamic behavior. In most cases, the religious authorities govern—and legislate—without authority from Baghdad, and certainly without any reference to the freedoms incorporated in Iraq's American-written interim constitution—the Transitional Administrative Law (TAL).

Dawa and SCIRI are not just promoting an Iranian-style political system —they are also directly promoting Iranian interests.

Comment Posted By Goodscarrier On 12.01.2007 @ 11:53

HINT: Maliki, Al-Hakim, et al have been trying to transform a `secular' Iraq (under SH) into a Shiite fundamentalist republic for the last two decades.

So, anyone who thinks Al-Maliki, Al-Hakim, et al are going to abandon their ambitions and allow Iraq to become anthing other than a Shiite fundamentalist republic (with close ties to Iran and Syria) is just plain stupid and/or completely ignorant of the nature and the history of the Al-Dawa party and the Suprme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (sic!!).

Comment Posted By Goodscarrier On 12.01.2007 @ 11:46


 


 


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